Manage Your Twitterverse by Email With Topify

Post by David Pierce. Find me on Twitter.

3047381255_52fce4f3ba One of the tough things about Twitter is that it doesn’t scale well – the more people you follow and the more you use Twitter, the harder it can become to manage. Following all the people you want to, dealing with all the people who follow you, and the like can make power-using Twitter a difficult being.

Fortunately, there are a few apps that are springing up around the Web in order to make dealing with followers and friends a lot easier. One of the best of the bunch has got to be Topify.

What Topify does is drastically improve the way that Twitter’s notifications work – the emails you get when you have a new follower, or when someone sends you a direct message.

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Find Friends, Colleagues, Lovers and Anyone Else on Twitter with Tweepz

Post by David Pierce. Find me on Twitter.

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Finding people on Twitter can be tough – many people’s usernames (myself included) are different from their real names, and Twitter’s search isn’t the most helpful if you’re trying to figure out which David Pierce you’re trying to find on Twitter.

For that purpose, I use Tweepz, a great Twitter-extending people search engine. Tweepz searches through biographies, names, and usernames to figure out who it is that you’re really looking for.

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Make Twitter Conversational with Twitoaster

Post by David Pierce. Find me on Twitter.

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My biggest beef with Twitter, as long as I’ve been using it, is that is does a poor job handling conversations. Unless you’re half the conversation (and usually even if you are), it’s really hard to see what’s going on – all you see is the random reply, without any context or background.

I’m hoping Twitter puts a “see whole conversation” button in the interface, allowing you to see who a given person is replying, to and what they’re saying. That way, when someone tells you you’re hilarious, you’ll understand perfectly what it is that they found so hysterical. Or, when you see someone else’s tweet saying “Wow. That is the single most incredible thing anyone has ever tweeted in the history of the world”, you’ll be able to find just what that is.

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One Man's Way of Managing Information

Post by David Pierce. Find me on Twitter.

149294506_62d9aadb55 Part of being a Web worker, an information junkie, or really anyone alive and with a curious bone in their body is figuring out how to manage all the inputs of information in our lives.

There’s more out there, more to know and learn, than we’d ever have time to actually consume and digest – that means we’ve got to figure out how to find what we want, deal with it properly, and ignore the rest.

Of all the systems I have and processes I use, my information system is both the most leak-proof and the one I’m most proud of. It involves a number of different websites and applications, various platforms and locations, and is obviously specific only to my particular situation.

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Plug Your Blog into Twitter with TwitterFeed

Post by David Pierce. Find me on Twitter.

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I’ve had a mild internal struggle, ever since I started using Twitter, over whether or not to add updates from The 2.0 Life to my tweets. Twitter’s a funny mix of both intensely personal and completely impersonal, and it’s a difficult balance to strike. Any advice? I’m all ears.

For a lot of people, though, putting their posts on Twitter is a no-brainer, and Twitter is definitely becoming a threat to RSS Readers everywhere, as it’s so easy to find and click links right from within Twitter.

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Finally, a Twitter Client That Works For Me

Post by David Pierce. Find me on Twitter.

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As a Twitter convert (after much internal battling), I’ve been in that irritating process recently of trying to find out which client or application to use to manage the Twittering I do with the Tweeps in my Twitterverse.

I’ve used a bunch of them; TweetDeck and Twhirl both even stuck with me for a while. I got rid of Twhirl because it was boring and slow, and TweetDeck now needs to go: I just looked at my computer’s power usage, and TweetDeck was using 1.3GB of RAM! Not okay.

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Find The Answers to All Life's Questions

This is a guest post by Squealer from Squealing Rat.

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Getting answers to your questions is becoming an increasingly popular service to offer on the internet. Now there are several services that are different takes on this concept.

(David’s note: there are a couple of services here that are currently in an invite-only beta. We’ve gotten a few invites for each one to give to you, our wonderful readers. See the end of this post for how to score an invite – make sure to stay tuned, we’ll let you know when they go public!)

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25 Apps that Add Form and Function to Twitter

Post by David Pierce. Find me on Twitter.

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Many if not all experienced Twitter users use an application other than the Twitter web interface, and for good reason. TweetDeck’s my personal favorite; others use Twirhl, Tweetie, or any of a huge number of ways to manage your Twitter account.

But I’m not talking about those. Below are 25 applications that do something Twitter or the applications on which most of us use Twitter, don’t.

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Beat Infosaturation: Wade in the Stream

Post by David Pierce. Find me on Twitter.

2595497078_4f6d5367bcOne of the things a lot of people are discussing recently, particularly related to the Internet, is information overload. Many of us have enormous numbers of inboxes, all of which do nothing but present us with information: RSS, email, IM, Twitter, Facebook, and countless other examples.

Ruud Hein, a blogger I like a lot, wrote on this subject a while ago:

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All-in-One Online Reading with Streamy

Post by David Pierce. Find me on Twitter.

dual-screen-laptop_12Reading news online has become a fairly standardized experience. You subscribe to some RSS feeds, then read new stories in any of a number of applications – Google Reader, FeedDemon and others. While this is the most popular way to do it, it may not be the best.

Streamy is a new application that changes how you receive and read news and updates, and does an awfully good job of it. With this one application, you can follow your Twitter, Facebook, Digg, Flickr, and Friendfeed streams, as well as any of the news and RSS feeds you want to follow.

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